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March 08, 2005

Milk...it does what?

From Reuters via CNN:

Children who drink more milk do not necessarily develop healthier bones, researchers said on Monday in a report that stresses exercise and modest consumption of calcium-rich foods such as tofu.

The U.S. government has gradually increased recommendations for daily calcium intake, largely from dairy products, to between 800 and 1,300 milligrams to promote healthy bones and prevent osteoporosis.

But the report, published in the journal Pediatrics, said boosting consumption of milk or other dairy products was not necessarily the best way to provide the minimal calcium intake of at least 400 milligrams per day.

Other ways to obtain the absorbable calcium found in one cup of cow's milk include a cup of fortified orange juice, a cup of cooked kale or turnip greens, two packages of instant oats, two-thirds cup of tofu, or 1 2/3 cups of broccoli, the report said.

I've known that for some time...but it's hard to convince people that entrenched fallacies are wrong. I still remember arguing with a doctor about it and asking how much milk an adult moose, which sheds it's antlers each year, drinks. A moose's antlers are made of the same material his bones are, and would be the equivalent to several human skeletons. Moose get their calcium from the plants they eat and normally do not drink milk once they are weaned. Mustard greens would also be a good source of calcium, if you can stand the taste, so would collard greens, but turnip greens seem to be the best source. My dad was always fond of Poke Salad, but the USDA doesn't seem to have any nutritional info on it, probably because few people eat it. (I don't care for it all that much myself)

Posted by Jack Lewis at March 8, 2005 10:36 AM

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