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September 30, 2005

Should we end Citizenship by birth?

From the Palm Beach Post...

Groups upset about illegal immigration and some Republican lawmakers say that any reform — such as the one proposed by President Bush — must include a provision to end birthright citizenship for the children of illegal immigrants and temporary workers.

Rep. Tom Tancredo, R-Colo., who heads a 90-member caucus pushing to tighten immigration laws, has introduced his proposal to deny citizenship to U.S.-born children of temporary immigrant workers.

He said the provision was vital because immigrants do not want to leave after their visas expire if their children are U.S. citizens.

In addition, Rep. Nathan Deal, R-Ga., has proposed a measure that would amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to limit automatic citizenship at birth to children of U.S. citizens and lawful residents.

And Rep. Mark Foley, R-Jupiter, introduced a constitutional amendment that would eliminate birthright citizenship for the children of illegal immigrants.

Most scholars believe a constitutional amendment is necessary to change the birthright citizenship provision, but some disagree because of different interpretations of the 14th Amendment. Changing the Constitution requires ratification by three-fourths of the states.

I have heard tales of pregnant women risking their lives to get across the border so their baby could be born in the US and then become US citizens. What Tancredo and Foley propose would not apply to legal immigrants or visitors, only to those here illegally. Unfortunately it would take an amendment to keep such a law in place since it violates what the 14th Amendment seems to grant.

Posted by Danny Carlton at September 30, 2005 05:48 AM

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